mission statement

 

Look, we all know a Mission Statement can be a joke. I knew a man who invented a general mission statement good for any company. The Doers: “Doing What We Do.”

The truth is, however, that having a Mission Statement is part of defining your company’s goals and direction. Like writing a good tweet, a real one packs a lot of power into just a few words. It focuses the mind.

Yeah, even now I hear you whining, “I don’t need a mission statement. I know my business. I do it every hour of every day.”

And that’s the problem.

I’ve found that so many business owners and managers have understandably become so focused on the day-to-day challenges that they loose sight of the big picture. And, even worse, their employees, and even their customers end up not knowing what the company really stands for.

Knowing your BIG goals is part of making a mission statement.

McDonald’s Mission Statement:
McDonald’s vision is to be the world’s best quick service restaurant experience. Being the best means providing outstanding quality, service, cleanliness, and value so that we make every customer in every restaurant smile.

Google’s Mission Statement:
Google’s mission is to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.

ADM, which supplies agricultural products, says:
Our vision is to unlock the potential of nature to improve the quality of life.

The author Janel M. Radtle suggests that every mission statement should answer three questions:

What needs do we address?
How do we address these needs?
What are our values?

Just in case you’re not a believer in making a marketing plan yet, here’s a terrific piece from Entrepreneur by Payson Cooper telling just how bad it can get when you don’t know where you’re going.

The author Janel M. Radtle suggests that every mission statement should answer three questions:

  • What needs do we address?
  • How do we address these needs?
  • What are our values?

Just in case you’re not a believer in making a marketing plan yet, here’s a terrific piece from Entrepreneur by Payson Cooper telling just how bad it can get when you don’t know where you’re going.